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irene. it was a tropical storm, warm and it was just water. we may get the wind here. we may get some property damage and people here are bracing for some power outages. so that's about it for now. we're fortunate. for irene we actually had a tornado, haven't had anything like that in terms of property damage. lots of flooding that we've shown you. you showed the viewers footage from dewey beach, lots of that type flooding throughout the area because of all the water in coastal delaware, over 50,000 people ordered out, evacuations. it's a lot more than that now because a lot of people have left on their own. >> we'd like to see bruce a bit closer in. >> someone was giving him grief for being in a shelter earlier. we won't do that ever again. we also saw pictures out of atlantic city where the storm actually went ashore. you have entire sections of the boardwalk atlantic city washed out to the ocean, haven't seen anything like that. >> it's a powerful storm. we always tell crews in the field on days like this safety is their top priority. here's why. cbs' chip reid is in ocean city cov
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
to clear but also to get, for example, the power companies back in. >> reporter: during hurricane irene last year, about 6 million homes lost electricity. this researcher plugged in all the information into a new program, and he believes this will be worse. >> our estimate at this point is 10 million. it could be higher. it could be lower. >> reporter: 10 million or more without power for a week to ten days, which is why this wisconsin company has added extra shifts, trying to build as many portable generators as quickly as possible. officials worry that residents might misuse some of those generators, putting them indoors, or stringing extension cords dangerously. many seem to be heeding the warnings, checking off their lists of preparedness, batteries, water, nonperishable food. >> i'm nervous about losing power. i'm nervous about the storm. >> reporter: some of the best advice from officials, if a tree takes down one of your power lines, leave the power line alone. leave the tree limb alone as well. let the power company take care of it. david kerley, abc news, rehoboth beach, delawa
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
irene. keep in mind we are still high -- i lost track of what time it is but high tide is not until 7:30 and the wind keeps on increasing. the tide's coming n. we've got more and more rain so all this water is just going to get so much worse and especially when you think that we are only at the very, very beginning of this storm. we still have at least 36 hours to go here in rehoboth beach with hurricane sandy. and this has been going on since yesterday at around 4:00 in the afternoon. that's when we first started to really feel wow, that is probably the first big gust that i felt since we've been out here. we've been seeing really sustained winds that have been increasing throughout the night. but really within the last half- hour or so is when we first started to feel these huge gusts just coming in from the beach. we've got wave heights of about well over 20 feet now off the shore and it's just going to keep on getting worse. yesterday i talked with the governor of delaware. he was saying that already yesterday afternoon it was looking so much worse then that it was at the peak of
's the number we're urging our residents to call. >> mr. gill, after irene and after the derecho, do you feel that you're better prepared, you know exactly what needs to happen for this storm? >> i believe the county is very much prepared to deal with what we are beginning -- [indiscernible] >> mr. gill, thank you very much. i do want to repeat ronald gill, jr. from the prince george's county 311 center says there is a shelter open. at 10:00 a.m. the richie coliseum will be open to shelter people on the campus of the university of maryland. again mr. gill, thank you and you be safe as well in this storm. >>> 9news team coverage of hurricane sandy continues with a look at things on the northeastern shore. kristin fisher is live along rehoboth beach in delaware with a look at conditions there. chris continue, we saw shots of the surf and it was really starting to kick up. >> reporter: definitely starting to kick up. you know this is not your normal hurricane when you are dressed in full ski gear to cover it. it is cold and getting colder. windy and getting so much windier. it is raining and it
. a lot of people said they were not going to ride it out like they did irene. it's hard to say. you can see some of the windows in some of these high rises where there is power to them, generator power or what have you, but obviously it's very dark down here in lower manhattan with the power that's been shut off on purpose in many areas and that's the con edison said that they are doing that so they can easily -- more easily restore power once this storm goes through. but they've got a lot on their hands tonight, as we mentioned, with that explosion on one of the transformers on the other side. >> ida single, thank you so much. if we can go back to that video that we were just looking at, for people that have not seen the coverage throughout the evening, this is a picture of a crane atop a luxury high rise in midtown manhattan. it has been dangling precariously, dangerously off the top of that building which has become known in manhattan as the global billionaire's club because the nine full floors at the top have been sold to billionaires. two of the dupe pleks are $90 million each. yo
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
. >> it's a big storm. we have faced that with irene a little bit and because of the size and projected magnitude, it's questionable about where it's going to be and how big it really will building. >> this particular time we have no plans to evacuate ocean city. we have to make decisions with regard to our resident and visitors. we're certainly be prepared to -- we'll certainly be prepared to do. so. >> reporter: if you have plans to be up in rehoboth in delaware for the sea witch festival which attracts as many as 30,000 people, where he -- rehoboth is not cancelling any of that. live in ocean city, i'm scott broom, 9 news now. >>> officials are closing asoteaque state island and park. vehicles will not be permitted after 7 p.m. the closures will last at least through tuesday as that storm coming in. >>> hurricane sandy having an impact on the race for president already. republican challenger mitt romney canceled an appearance for sunday in virginia beach because of concerns about that storm. sandy is kicking up waves and dumping rain on florida already and while the timing could ha
and wind. again, the big rain still coming down. flood warnings still statewide. irene we got over 10 rough result the coastal concerns will be not just tonight, on the eastern shore. the chesapeake bay flooding will continue tomorrow as winds will turn southwest and tomorrow we'll be watching the bay carefully, too. back to you. >> boy, joce sterman out at bwi got a taste of the storm. look that the that. >> reporter: things have really picked up here at bwi, the bge staging headquarters. they are wrapping things up. because of the the dwindling, deteriorating conditions at this point, they will take the workers that are left and bust them out to area hotels. each one is designated to go to a different hotel. at this point the staging hear for bge has become -- area for bge has become very, very minimally active. the rest of them -- the most of them have moved on to other locations as the wind intensifies quite a bit. they are planning at this point to shut down all four staging areas when they think the weather will be better. they have these four locations scattered around the baltimore
as it comes in, this is a cold wind. this is nothing like irene. irene was tropical, warm, no problem at all. this is actually cold, so not very comfort l, but you wouldn't want to -- comforting, but you wouldn't want to miss this, would you? >> bruce, get back with us. we want you on this side of the ocean, not in the ocean. >>> andrea mccarren has been out all day on river road in bethesda. earlier she had the adventure of the blowing barriers. we'll find out where she is now. venezuelan? >> reporter: derek, we've had reinforcements here now. there's u.s. park police. the barriers have blown over to this side. there's some on the other side of the street. basically park police did the right thing. i think they've probably given up on them and they are planting a police cruiser in the middle of the intersection to prevent people from going down little falls parkway between river road and mass avenue. it is a very different bethesda that we're seeing right now. some of the wind guss have been extraordinary. look up river road now and you -- gust have been extraordinary. look up river road n
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
was boarded up. the second time it's been shut down. first being last year in the lead up to hurricane irene. >> i need to go to port authority and i need to catch a bus. >> went down here to get her back on the train and i don't think -- i don't know are the buses running? >> reporter: for many new yorkers sunday was a day to prepare for the storm or get out of town. >> we were called several times by our building management company and told we had to evacuate, so we're off. >> reporter: and classes at all public schools today have been cancelled and dozens of schools have been turned into shelters. all broadway shows for tonight have been cancelled. >> the conditions out there are expected to get worse throughout the morning. what's it like out there right now? >> reporter: well right now we're seeing some wind. we are next to the water so this is normally a windy area. we're seeing winds starting to pick up just a little bit. a tiny bit of drizzle. nothing compared to what we're expecting later today. >> thanks. hurricane sandy is affecting the race for the white house as well. early voti
. >> reporter: sandy is expected to do more damage than irene's $15 billion price tag. in rehoboth beach, erika gonzalez, news 4. >>> and working, getting ready for the marine corps marathon tomorrow? >> yes. i think okay. see a few showers early tomorrow morning, but that's really going to be about it. as far as our weather goes, the next couple of days, man, things are going downhill very, very quickly. again, a nice night tonight. not too bad tomorrow and tomorrow night is when things get started. look now, where hurricane sandy is. outside no problem. if you're making your way out and about, you still have time to prepare for the storm as its making its way our way now. enjoy this evening. go out if you get a chance to. enjoy yourself. the next few days you may not have power in your house. hur kay sandy making its way up the coast now. off the coast of jacksonville. you can see the center of the storm right here. kind of looks like a hurricane, but all of this out here, starting to take on extra tropical characteristics. that's not going to matter to you. sandy now, winds of 75 miles an ho
. part of it is because there were so many spectators out here for irene and they don't want that again when you could be dealing with a once if a century sort of storm. look at that break. oh, my gosh. that's what you would see surfers going through, those little tubes. i don't even know the proper terminology for that. i mean, we've just been seeing set after set of incredible waves out here. in terms of what we're seeing like damage, stuff like that, no real huge trees down. no power lines down, at least right here in the boardwalk area. we know we're seeing it up and down more on the bay side again. it's just the story right now is the waves. we've got a good amount of rain. it's definitely blowing in my face. we're getting some good stronger gusts of wind. but sustained winds, they don't feel too bad. it still feels more like a tropical storm than a hurricane. of course that's because hurricane sandy still several hundred miles away from us here. let's just go back to the boardwalk real quick. i'll show you some of the businesses that -- how they're dealing with this storm. you can
larger than anything we have experienced most recently, like irene. richard? >> erica, keep it safe out there. >>> today people living in the district can pick up sandbags to protect their homes from flooding. d.c.'s department of public works will hand out sandbags at the tacoma park center. d.c. residents can stop by from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to pick up their sandbags. there is a five-bag limit per car. >>> throughout our area people are preparing for the worst, not only stocking up for the possibility of long power outages but in some neighborhoods they're bracing for flooding. news 4's jackie bensen reports. >> reporter: in the huntington section of fairfax county it's a tense game of watching and waiting. this flyer was hand delivered to every home in the area which has been devastated regularly by flooding, warning residents to be prepared. as recently as august, residents of this neighborhood were pumping water out of their basements. >> we've been preparing for a couple days. >> reporter: at twins ace hardware store on main street in fairfax, you can tell what people need by
the last time was in 2011 during hurricane irene. >>> breaking news from prince george's county tonight. police issued an amber alert for three children, all under the age of 5. they were abducted during a car theft at a gas station tonight. darcy spencer is at the scene. darcy? >> reporter: doreen, i was able to confirm within the last several minutes that police have recovered that vehicle. but here's the -- the bizarre twist. they say that the children were not in that car. it was locationed in southeast washington and they say, in fact there are no car seats in the car. they're investigating to try to figure out what exactly did happen here. now we are at the exxon station. this is where the woman called police. but the incident happened just down the street in the 8400 block of central avenue. the mom was apparently pumping gas, at some point, a dodge intrepid pulls pup. suspect got out. jumped into her car taking off with her three children inside the car. now police tell me that she got in the car with a witness to this incident and they tried to chase the car. they lost sight of
inches plus. that will rival hurricane agnes in 1972. some spots actually with irene got up to 10 inches on the eastern shore last summer. but blizzard snows from western maryland. they could be measuring snow in the feet before the end of this. and of course the airport travel delays will continue to stack up. are there rifles? when's the last time we had one like this? we've never in recorded history had one like it. but these are the closest we can come up with. the perfect storm in 1991. that was a nor'easter, hybrid type system. it formed from hurricane grace well out at sea. it still sledded the massachusetts shore line, though. the chesapeake hurricane in 1933. that actually created the ocean city inlet. we go down to ocean city near the board walk, and go out and walk along the inlet. that wasn't there before 1933. that hurricane was a long-lived event. by all reports it churned for two or three days. similar to this storm because we'll be dealing with this for two full days. then agnes, 72. it was actually nicknamed hurricane agony for pennsylvania and north maryland, and laurel
. irene brought in $4.3 billion in damage last year. it was one of the top ten costliest u.s. returns in history. the insurance adjusters are already on the scene they could go in as early as wednesday and write checks on the spot for policyholders>> wall street some of the banks are heclosed today. >> they are closed today and likely tomorrow. electronic trading late last night much of lower manhattan has already been evacuated. they are operating on a work at home basis. heather? >> here is something of major concern we have seen gas prices dip recently but they could be on their way up. that's because refineries could be shut down. >> 6 northeast oil refineries could be affected they have 6.2 million of barrels a day. october 1st the official month in the 2013 model year. if some of the car dearlies shut down they may not be unloading the vehicles. >> keep our fishings crossed on gas prices and insurance issues as well. >> lauren thank you so much. >> good to see you. quick look at headlines. he was the prime suspect. ainsley take it away from here. >> he was the prime suspect in t
and everything. >> you generally stick around. how about irene, you stuck around for that one, too? >> caller: yes, di. >> how did you stick around? >> caller: i did good. i stayed right in my room. >> one of the rearngs evelyn, that officials tell people to get out is, they don't want to risk the lives of rescuers. >> caller: i know. >> trying to get to people like you. does that ever cross your mind? >> caller: well, today, i told my family, this is my last time for now on when they say evacuate, i am. because today, i cried. i was scared. this is worse than what i went through last year. i will never go through this again. >> you are not out of the woods yet. >> caller: i know, i know. yeah. i know. >> do you have any plans to... to try it get out even under the current circumstances? or are you going to hunker down? >> caller: right now, like i said, thank god, the water went down. but if it's down, i will leave in the morning, you know what i'm saying? right now, thank god, it's all right. the trees we had -- they're small. i'm between two houses and the trees, all, my point's far are aw
, then hurricane irene was because of the storm. here, can you easily see we've already got some light rainfall. rainfall. this will increase and spread and get heavier and steadier once we move into the course of the day as the system gets closer to us. just be very prepared. flooding issues everywhere as well as strong winds. what we'll begin with is a look at the spaghetti model. this has been a real key for you as we put together the forecast on this. the spaghetti models are coming together. it looks thick it will be right through this entire area of this cone of uncertainty right near in terms of landfall. still a cat -- category one hurricane. look like tonight into tomorrow in terms of landfall before it becomes a remnant low f you -- if you take a look at how wide this cone is here, that is an indication of just how far the reach will be in term of the impact of the winds. the wind ill be major factor here because they will be very strong. we are talking wind that could pick up to 60 to 70 plus mile posterior -- mile per hour in term of gusts. with these strong winds, it will continu
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
in the northeast. six million were without power after tropical storm irene last year. so tanh, thank you. i appreciate that report, sir. let's get back to politics now, as we've been reporting in person early voting started today here in the sunshine state. that is later than it started for the 2008 election by a week. the legislature haas year cutting the number of early voting days from 14 to eight. how could early voting in florida and elsewhere as well, how could it change the 2012 presidential campaign? i'm joined now by bill schneider, resident fellow at third way. bill, good afternoon to you, sir. >> good afternoon, craig. >> you know, first, let's talk about early voting in general, because it really has become quite the transformative phenomenon in this country when you look at how many people were doing it in 2000 versus here in 2012. how is early voting, how has it changed campaigning for white house in this country? >> well, it certainly has made campaigning far more extensive earlier because people are already voting. so the campaigns have to make their closing arguments weeks
're talking about experience with these bad storms. hurricane irene hit this place last year and the people here had the experience of this kind of flooding, but not as rapid as what we've been seeing. we have been in a constant -- [ no audio ] >> we lost david mattingly, obviously, technically, as you can imagine it is very difficult to maintain contact. that's why i'm talking on the phone. we literally got knocked off the air a short time ago. let's bring in chad myers, who is monitoring events in the severe weather center. what are we looking at in terms of timeline now for folks who are watching this and trying to figure out how long they're going to have been staying in their homes, how long this is going to last? when is the water going to peak, when will we start to see some of this water receding and how long is this thing going to be lasting for? >> i don't think we'll see the water recede enough through the low tide that we won't have another high tide on top of what we're seeing now in some spots. we could continue this flooding for another two tide cycles so at least another alm
power right now. there was criticism after last year's hurricane irene. remember that? but the governor said utility and power companies will be working together to be more efficient. you see this video of that boathouse that succumbed to the winds and water of sandy. schools in boston were closed. and all public transportation was suspended today. >>> and the streets are flooded, and in a lot of places the water is still rising. >> yeah. new jersey, for instance. only one of the areas that is still getting pounded. new reports, new details, all straight ahead as we take you through the night. early morning hours. ♪... ♪... choose the perfect hotel >>> these are pictures out of ocean city. ocean city, maryland or new jersey? all right. ocean city, new jersey here. you can see the storm surge that's moved in anywhere between five feet and twelve feet in some parts along the jersey-new york coast. that's where we saw roughly 12 hours ago. pretty remarkable images there. right now, however, that superstorm sandy moving further inland. it's leaving behind all the flooding in the northea
of packing long johns and ear mu muffs. it is freezing out here. i want you to take a look. irene was easy. bring on sandy. minimal damage on rehoboth avenue and even along the boardwalk. you're seeing some debris, sandbags here. honestly, this town, this city was expecting a whole lot worse. i think a lot of people were. a lot of people waking up this morning very, very thankful for the things that have gone on in the course of the last 24 hours, at least here for us locally. new york, new jersey, a very different story. more than eight inches of rain here in rehoboth. more than 6,000 power outages and still a driving ban in effect. but this morning, again, with that driving ban, businesses as well are not going to be open until after the 4:30 hour. still a very cold, very light drizzly morning here in rehoboth. how are you holding up? >> we're fine. especially compared to you. you guys have been working overtime in in rehoboth. thakds to you guys on team rehoboth. we'll see you in a bit. >>> the wind may be dying down, but hundreds of thousands of people in our area still in the dark. mo
here during hurricane irene. hurricane sandy is coming on strong. here's what he had to say yesterday around 4:00 in the afternoon. take a listen. >> i haven't seen a whole lot worse than this and the storm is already hundreds of miles -- it's still hundreds of miles away. so what it will be when it actually hits is very concerning. that's why we're asking people to treat this really seriously. >> reporter: it looks like a lot of people out here in rehoboth beach are taking this seriously, although we still have seen a lot of folks out here deciding to ride out the storm. you are seeing the 14-foot, 15- foot tall waves crashing into the rehoboth beach boardwalk. all the businesses right along the beach have all boarded up. they are all closed down and they're going to stay this way for several more days. lots of sandbags, lots of boarded up, taped windows. really a ghost town over there. you can see the waves just creeping closer and closer to the shore. we are still three hours away from high tide. farther down in ocean city, i believe their boardwalk is still standing. social media
thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> we actually got engaged here last year and the storm came in and we had to leave early and now we're here. we got married, on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. >> isn't it good luck though to rain on your wedding day? if you can find the silver lining and try to tie that in. >> we'll check back in with them in a couple years. see how they're doing. >>> coming up on news 4 today a holiday hallmark. a rush to give the national christmas tree its debut before sandy steals the show. >>> protecting your property from flooding. liz crenshaw shares some do it yourself projects you can do now before the storm. >>> remember, storm team 4 is tracking the hurricane sandy on air and online. sign up for breaking news alerts on nbc washington.com. also follow us on facebook and >>> take a look at sandy. the system is now a tropical storm but still has the potential to regain its hurricane status as it inches up the east coast and of course everyone around here and all across the easte
, the water level should be somewhere right about here on this marble. with irene, it was about a foot, two feet shorter than this. that's one of the things we'll be watching with the subway system. if the saltwater gets in, there's corrosion, it's a mess. that would be a multi-million dollar disaster. the last time that happened was with dawn. well up the eeriest sound, the wind whipping 20, 30 miles an hour higher than what we're dealing with down here at the surface, there are two cranes attached up there. they've been shaking all day. but it's just a fascinating storm. it's 58 degrees in new york city. yet there's a storm surge coming up, the highest we've ever seen in new york city's recorded history. just an amazing storm, guys. i'm going to go on record, i won't admit it to him, you can tell doug kammerer he did pretty well on this one. >> all right. we'll tell him you said that. bill, i want to ask you this, here in the washington area, most of the local officials told the folks to stay indoors to shelter in place, stay off the streets. and everywhere we go, we see people who are st
that with irene and because of the size of the storm, it's a little questionable exactly where it's going to be and how big it really will be. this particur time we have no plans to evacuate ocean city. we have to makedecisions with regard to our residents and visitors. we'll certainly be prepared to do so. >> reporter: so the time frame down here is take advantage of the good weather while they ve it. it looks like if they'll have to make some serious decisions, they'll be doing that starting saturday evening into sunday so people can make plans and move if that's what the decision is going to be. that's a similar situation throughout the communities up and down the coast here in maryland and also in delaware. in fact, this weekend at rehoboth beach a big civic celebration called the sea witch -- that's a halloween theme event -- that's going to draw 20 to 30,000 people into town in rehoboth and there are no plans to cancel that now, but folks will have to watch very carefully and i think a lot of people will want to leave the coast sometime early to mid-sunday. reporting live at ocean
here. we've dealt with snowmageddon. we survived irene a few years back. some of us remember agnes, a mother of all storms, we're still here, still standing. as we will be after this one as a memory. here's the second reason. it might not be as bad as it could be. let's put our collective energy together and send that thought out into the universe. always keep in mind, though, the fundamental truth that my aunt used to lay on me all the time, boy, she said, youe got to remember, that man poses and god disposes. >> amen. >> take a deep breath. >>> "nightly news" next. [ earnest ] out of the blue one day, we were told to build a 30-foot stage. gathered the guys and we built that 30-foot stage, not knowing what it was for. just days later, all three shifts were told to assemble in the warehouse. a group of people walked out on that stage and told us that the plant is now closed and all of you are fired... i looked both ways, i looked at the crowd, and...we all just lost our jobs. we don't have an income. mitt romney made over 100 million dollars by shutting down our plant and devastat
they know the drill. thanks to hurricane irene last year. >> w actually got engaged here last year. and the storm came in last year. we had to leave early. now we're here. we got married on our honeymoon. and the storm came in again. >> some luck. so far no evacuation orders have been issued for the town. our own erika gonzalez is in rehoboth and caught up with the "today" show's al roker who says sandy is a storm we'll be talking about for a while. >> you have to be prepared for a lot of rain and you have to be prepared for a lot of wind. i think you got to be prepared for a storm surge and if you're not along the coast don't think you're out of the woods either because, you know, the parts of inland maryland, virginia, pennsylvania, all going to see effects from this. so i think this is a storm that could be really one we'll be talking about for years to come. >> next the arrangements you may want to make now. >> we'll also take your questions on facebook and twitter. send them to us right now. use the hash tag sandy d.c. we'll try to get to as many as possible. >> storm team 4 i
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